Free Applications you can Use to Build Websites

The internet is filled with free applications you can use to build a professional website. WordPress by far is the choice of newbies and seasoned developers as well. But, there are many other free applications that have been around for a long time and some new arrivals that developers use to set up dynamic websites on the Internet.

Free Open-Source Applications Can Save your Thousands of Dollars

Free speaks everyone's language! Thank goodness for free Internet open-source software applications that can save you thousands of dollars on ...
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Build Your Website For Free

In today’s digital age, every business should have a website. A Website is built to educate, it is a unique ...
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10 Free Small Business Tools…

The following are free Desktop Business Software Alternatives to Commercial Brands…. 1. LibreOffice An Alternative to Microsoft Office.. LibreOffice is ...
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Internet Job Sites

Career One Stop 

About: CareerOneStop is the flagship career, training, and job search website for the U.S. Department of Labor. The website serves job seekers, businesses, students, and career advisors with a variety of free online tools, information, and resources.

Website: Visit Website

State Job Banks

About: State Job Banks. In-state employers can post jobs free to their respective state’s Workforce Agency web site. Registration, validation process and job posting time frames may vary by state. Search your state to locate job openings in your area. 

Website: Visit Website

Indeed

About: This is a comprehensive job search website that contains hundreds of jobs. Indeed includes all the job listings from major job boards, newspapers, associations, and company career pages,

Website: Visit Website

Peppermint Oil

Common Names: peppermint, peppermint oil

Latin Names: Mentha x piperita

Background

  • The herb peppermint, a natural cross between two types of mint (water mint and spearmint), grows throughout Europe and North America. Both peppermint leaves and the essential oil from peppermint have been used for health purposes. (Essential oils are very concentrated oils containing substances that give a plant its characteristic odor or flavor.) Peppermint is a common flavoring agent in foods, and peppermint oil is used to create a pleasant fragrance in soaps and cosmetics.
  • Mint has been used for health purposes for several thousand years. It is mentioned in records from ancient Greece, Rome, and Egypt. However, peppermint was not recognized as a distinct kind of mint until the 1700s.
  • Today, peppermint is used as a dietary supplement for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), other digestive problems, the common cold, headaches, and other conditions. Peppermint oil is also used topically (applied to the skin) for headache, muscle aches, itching, and other problems. Peppermint leaf is available in teas, capsules, and as a liquid extract. Peppermint oil is available as liquid solutions and in capsules, including enteric-coated capsules.

How Much Do We Know?

  • A small amount of research has been conducted on peppermint oil, primarily focusing on IBS.
  • Very little research has been done on peppermint leaf.

What Have We Learned?

  • Peppermint oil has been studied most extensively for IBS. Results from several studies indicate that peppermint oil in enteric-coated capsules may improve IBS symptoms.
  • A few studies have indicated that peppermint oil, in combination with caraway oil, may help relieve indigestion, but this evidence is preliminary and the product that was tested is not available in the United States.
  • Peppermint oil has been used topically for tension headaches and a limited amount of evidence suggests that it might be helpful for this purpose.
  • There’s not enough evidence to allow any conclusions to be reached about whether peppermint oil is helpful for nausea, the common cold, or other conditions.
  • There’s not enough evidence to show whether peppermint leaf is helpful for any condition.

What Do We Know About Safety?

  • Peppermint oil appears to be safe when taken orally (by mouth) in the doses commonly used. Excessive doses of peppermint oil can be toxic.
  • Possible side effects of peppermint oil include allergic reactions and heartburn. Capsules containing peppermint oil are often enteric-coated to reduce the likelihood of heartburn. If enteric-coated peppermint oil capsules are taken at the same time as antacids, the coating can break down too quickly.
  • Like other essential oils, peppermint oil is highly concentrated. When the undiluted essential oil is used for health purposes, only a few drops are used.
  • Side effects of applying peppermint oil to the skin can include skin rashes and irritation. Peppermint oil should not be applied to the face or chest of infants or young children because serious side effects may occur if they inhale the menthol in the oil.
  • No harmful effects of peppermint leaf tea have been reported. However, the long-term safety of consuming large amounts of peppermint leaf is unknown.

Keep in Mind

  • Tell all your health care providers about any complementary or integrative health approaches you use. Give them a full picture of what you do to manage your health. This will help ensure coordinated and safe care.

Disclaimer/ Disclosure

This information contained in this article is for information purposes only and. and it is not intended to substitute for the medical expertise and advice of your health care provider(s). We encourage you to discuss any decisions about treatment or care with your health care provider. According to the NCCIH the mention of any product, service, or therapy is not an endorsement by NCCIH nor do I endorse any products or methods used.

Flaxseed and Flaxseed Oil

Flaxseed and Flaxseed Oil

Common Names: flaxseed, flax, linseed

Latin Names: Linum usitatissimum

Background

  • Over the thousands of years it’s been cultivated, flaxseed has had a variety of health and industrial uses. Around 500 B.C., Hippocrates wrote about flaxseed being a laxative, and pioneers in North America made flaxseed dressings for cuts and burns. Fiber from the plant is made into linen, and oil from the seed is used in paints, among other products.
  • Today, flaxseed and flaxseed oil are used as dietary supplements for constipation, diabetes, cholesterol, cancer, and other conditions.
  • Flaxseed is made into tablets, extracts, powder, and flour. The oil is also put in capsules.

How Much Do We Know?

  • There have been a number of studies in people of flaxseed and flaxseed oil, including their effect on hot flashes.

What Have We Learned?

  • Flaxseed contains fiber, which generally helps with constipation. However, there’s little research on the effectiveness of flaxseed for constipation.
  • Studies of flaxseed and flaxseed oil to lower cholesterol levels have had mixed results. A 2009 research review found that flaxseed lowered cholesterol only in people with relatively high initial cholesterol levels.
  • Flaxseed doesn’t decrease hot flashes, studies from 2010 and 2012 suggest.
  • NCCIH is funding preliminary research on the potential role of substances in flaxseed for ovarian cancer, cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, asthma, and inflammation.

What Do We Know About Safety?

  • Don’t eat raw or unripe flaxseeds, which may contain potentially toxic compounds.
  • Flaxseed and flaxseed oil supplements seem to be well tolerated in limited amounts. Few side effects have been reported.
  • Avoid flaxseed and flaxseed oil during pregnancy as they may have mild hormonal effects. There’s little reliable information on whether it’s safe to use flaxseed when nursing.
  • Flaxseed, like any fiber supplement, should be taken with plenty of water, as it could worsen constipation or, in rare cases, cause an intestinal blockage. Both flaxseed and flaxseed oil can cause diarrhea.

Keep in Mind

  • Tell all your health care providers about any complementary or integrative health approaches you use. Give them a full picture of what you do to manage your health. This will help ensure coordinated and safe care.

Disclaimer/ Disclosure

This information contained in this article is for information purposes only and. and it is not intended to substitute for the medical expertise and advice of your health care provider(s). We encourage you to discuss any decisions about treatment or care with your health care provider. According to the NCCIH the mention of any product, service, or therapy is not an endorsement by NCCIH nor do I endorse any products or methods used.

Garlic

Common Names: garlic

Latin Names: Allium sativum

Background

  • Garlic is the edible bulb from a plant in the lily family. It was traditionally used for health purposes by people in many parts of the world, including the Egyptians, Greeks, Romans, Chinese, Japanese, and Native Americans.
  • Currently, garlic is used as a dietary supplement for many purposes, including high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, and the common cold, as well as in attempts to prevent cancer and other diseases.
  • Fresh garlic, garlic powder, and garlic oil are used to flavor foods. Garlic dietary supplements are sold as tablets or capsules. Garlic oil may be used topically (applied to the skin).

How Much Do We Know?

  • A great deal of research has been done on garlic, but much of it consists of small, preliminary, or low-quality studies.

What Have We Learned?

  • There’s conflicting evidence about whether garlic lowers blood cholesterol levels. If it does, the effect is small, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (the so-called “bad” cholesterol that’s linked to increased heart disease risk) may not be reduced at all.
  • Garlic may be helpful for high blood pressure, but the evidence is weak.
  • Some studies indicate that certain groups of people who eat more garlic may be less likely to develop certain cancers, such as stomach and colon cancers. However, garlic in dietary supplement form has not been shown to help reduce the risk of these cancers. The National Cancer Institute recognizes garlic as one of several vegetables with potential anticancer properties but does not recommend using garlic dietary supplements for cancer prevention.
  • There’s not enough evidence to show whether garlic is helpful for the common cold.

What Do We Know About Safety?

  • Garlic is probably safe for most people in the amounts usually eaten in foods.
  • Side effects include breath and body odor, heartburn, and upset stomach. These side effects can be more noticeable with raw garlic. Some people have allergic reactions to garlic.
  • Taking garlic may increase the risk of bleeding. If you take an anticoagulant (blood thinner) such as warfarin (Coumadin) or if you need surgery, tell your health care provider if you’re taking or planning to take garlic dietary supplements.
  • Garlic has been found to interfere with the effectiveness of some drugs, including saquinavir, a drug used to treat HIV infection.

Keep in Mind

  • Tell all your health care providers about any complementary or integrative health approaches you use. Give them a full picture of what you do to manage your health. This will help ensure coordinated and safe care.

Disclaimer/ Disclosure

This information contained in this article is for information purposes only and. and it is not intended to substitute for the medical expertise and advice of your health care provider(s). We encourage you to discuss any decisions about treatment or care with your health care provider. According to the NCCIH the mention of any product, service, or therapy is not an endorsement by NCCIH nor do I endorse any products or methods used.

Cinnamon

Common Names: cinnamon, cinnamon bark, Ceylon cinnamon, cassia cinnamon

Latin Names: Cinnamomum verum (also known as Cinnamomum zeylanicum), Cinnamomum aromaticum (also known as Cinnamomum cassia)

Background

  • There are many types of cinnamon. Ceylon cinnamon (Cinnamomum verum), grown primarily in Sri Lanka, is known as “true” cinnamon. Cassia cinnamon (Cinnamomum aromaticum), grown in southeastern Asia, is the most common type sold in North America.
  • Used as a spice for thousands of years, cinnamon comes from the bark of various species of cinnamon trees. The leaves, flowers, fruits, and roots of cinnamon trees have also been used in cooking and for medicinal purposes. There are differences in the chemical composition of cinnamon products produced from different species or parts of cinnamon trees.
  • Cinnamon has a long history of use in traditional medicine in various parts of the world, including China, India, and Persia (Iran).
  • Today, cinnamon is promoted as a dietary supplement for diabetes or for irritable bowel syndrome or other gastrointestinal problems, as well as other conditions. Cassia cinnamon is promoted for topical use (application to the skin) as an insect repellent.

How Much Do We Know?

  • There have been many studies of cinnamon, especially for diabetes. However, the results of the studies are difficult to interpret because it’s often unclear what type of cinnamon and what part of the plant were used.

What Have We Learned?

  • Studies done in people don’t clearly support using cinnamon for any health condition.
  • A 2019 review of 18 studies of cinnamon supplementation in people with diabetes suggested that cinnamon could reduce blood sugar but didn’t have a significant effect on hemoglobin A1C, which reflects blood sugar levels over a longer period of time. However, it’s unclear whether these findings are meaningful because 10 of the studies didn’t identify the type of cinnamon used, and 8 of the studies were judged to be of low quality for other reasons.
  • It’s uncertain whether cinnamon is helpful for weight loss or for controlling blood levels of cholesterol and related lipids. There’s not enough evidence to show whether cinnamon is helpful for irritable bowel syndrome.
  • It’s unclear whether cassia cinnamon is effective as an insect repellent.

What Do We Know About Safety?

  • Cinnamon supplements appear to be safe when consumed in the amounts commonly used in foods as a spice or flavoring agent. Use in larger amounts or for long periods of time is sometimes associated with side effects, most commonly gastrointestinal problems or allergic reactions.
  • Cassia cinnamon contains a chemical called coumarin, which can be harmful to the liver. Some cassia cinnamon products contain high levels of this substance. In most cases, consuming cassia cinnamon doesn’t provide enough coumarin to cause significant problems. However, prolonged use of cassia cinnamon could be an issue for sensitive people, such as those with liver disease.
  • Little is known about whether it’s safe to use cassia cinnamon during pregnancy or while breastfeeding. Ceylon cinnamon may be unsafe for use during pregnancy if consumed in amounts greater than those commonly found in foods. Little is known about whether it’s safe to use Ceylon cinnamon during breastfeeding in amounts greater than those commonly found in foods.
  • Cinnamon should not be used in place of conventional medical care or to delay seeking care if you have health problems. This is particularly true if you have diabetes.

Keep in Mind

  • Take charge of your health—talk with your health care providers about any complementary health approaches you use. Together, you can make shared, well-informed decisions.

Disclaimer/ Disclosure

This information contained in this article is for information purposes only and. and it is not intended to substitute for the medical expertise and advice of your health care provider(s). We encourage you to discuss any decisions about treatment or care with your health care provider. According to the NCCIH the mention of any product, service, or therapy is not an endorsement by NCCIH nor do I endorse any products or methods used.

Aloe Vera

Aloe Vera

Common Names: aloe vera, aloe, burn plant, lily of the desert, elephant’s gall

Latin Names: Aloe veraAloe barbadensis

Background

  • Aloe vera’s use can be traced back 6,000 years to early Egypt, where the plant was depicted on stone carvings. Known as the “plant of immortality,” aloe was presented as a funeral gift to pharaohs.
  • Historically, aloe vera has been used for a variety of purposes, including treatment of wounds, hair loss, and hemorrhoids; it has also been used as a laxative.
  • Two substances from aloe vera, the clear gel and the yellow latex, are used in health products today. Aloe gel is primarily used topically (applied to the skin) as a remedy for skin conditions such as burns, frostbite, psoriasis, and cold sores, but it may also be taken orally (by mouth) for conditions including osteoarthritis, bowel diseases, and fever. Aloe latex is taken orally, usually for constipation.

How Much Do We Know?

  • There’s not enough evidence to show whether aloe vera is helpful for most of the purposes for which people use it.

What Have We Learned?

  • Aloe latex contains strong laxative compounds. Products made with aloe were at one time regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as over-the-counter (OTC) laxatives. In 2002, the FDA required that all OTC aloe laxative products be removed from the U.S. market or reformulated because the companies that manufactured them did not provide the safety data necessary for continued approval.
  • There’s some evidence that the topical use of aloe products might be helpful for symptoms of certain conditions such as psoriasis and certain rashes.
  • There’s not enough high-quality scientific evidence to show whether topical use of aloe helps to heal wounds.
  • There’s not enough scientific evidence to support aloe vera for any of its other uses.

What Do We Know About Safety?

  • Use of topical aloe vera is likely to be safe.
  • A 2-year National Toxicology Program study on oral consumption of nondecolorized whole leaf extract of aloe vera found clear evidence of carcinogenic activity in male and female rats, based on tumors of the large intestine. Another study in rats showed that decolorized whole leaf aloe vera did not cause harmful effects. This suggests that a component called aloin, most of which is removed by the decolorization process, may be responsible for the tumors seen in rats fed nondecolorized whole leaf aloe vera. More information, including what products are actually in the marketplace and how individuals use different types of aloe vera products, is needed to determine the potential risks to humans.
  • Abdominal cramps and diarrhea have been reported with oral use of aloe latex. Also, because aloe latex is a laxative, it may reduce the absorption and therefore the effectiveness of some drugs that are taken orally.
  • People with diabetes who use glucose-lowering medication should be cautious if also taking aloe orally because aloe may lower blood glucose levels.
  • There have been a few reported cases of acute hepatitis in people who took aloe vera orally. However, the evidence is not definitive.

Keep in Mind

  • Tell all your health care providers about any complementary or integrative health approaches you use. Give them a full picture of what you do to manage your health. This will help ensure coordinated and safe care.

Disclaimer/ Disclosure

This information contained in this article is for information purposes only and. and it is not intended to substitute for the medical expertise and advice of your health care provider(s). We encourage you to discuss any decisions about treatment or care with your health care provider. According to the NCCIH the mention of any product, service, or therapy is not an endorsement by NCCIH nor do I endorse any products or methods used..